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MIRACLE OF SOUND

Be sure to read the inspiring story of our patient Terri and how she recovered her hearing.

Miracle of Sound

Turn to page 7 of the Fall 2013 Edition of Maple Grove Hospital Magazine.

 

 

 

 

Patient Resources

TINNITUS AND INSULIN RESISTANCE

Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas.  Its function is to control blood glucose (sugar) and normalize metabolism.  When you have insulin resistance, your body produces insulin, but does not use it properly.   This leads to high levels of both glucose and insulin circulating in your blood.  High blood glucose may cause Tinnitus patients to experience worsening symptoms.

By being physically active, making healthier food choices, following a carbohydrate-controlled diet, ensuring adequate protein intake and reaching or maintaining a healthy weight, you can help your body respond better to insulin.  This in turn will help normalize your blood glucose levels and may improve your tinnitus symptoms.

Carbohydrate Counting

Carbohydrate counting can be used to track and balance the amount of carbohydrates in your diet. You can have better blood glucose control by keeping the amount of carbohydrates you eat consistent and spaced throughout the day.

What are the basics of carbohydrate counting?

  • Foods are made up of 3 components: carbohydrate, protein and fat.
  • Carbohydrate is the portion of food that affects blood glucose levels the most.
  • By using food labels and estimating portion sizes of foods, you can count the grams of carbohydrate in your diet.

What foods contain carbohydrates?

  •  Foods from the grain/starch, fruit and milk groups.
  •  Almost all dessert and snack foods.
  •  Starchy vegetables such as potatoes, squash, corn and peas.

How much carbohydrate do I need?

The amount of carbohydrate you need will vary based on your sex, height, weight and activity level. In general to promote better blood glucose control and improve tinnitus symptoms it is recommended that you consume 5-6 small meals per day.  Each small meal should include a good source of protein and 1-2 servings of carbohydrate.  The majority of your carbohydrate choices should come from fresh fruits, lowfat milk or yogurt, beans/lentils and whole grains.

Carbohydrate Serving Sizes

15 grams of carbohydrate = 1 serving or 1 carb unit

Grain/Starch Group – 1 serving equals:

  • 1 slice of bread
  • ½ a hamburger bun
  • ½ cup mashed potatoes
  • 1/3 cup rice or pasta
  • ½ cup corn
  • Approximately ¾ cup cereal (check food label on box)

Fruit Group – 1 serving equals:

  • 1 small piece of fruit
  • ½ cup orange juice
  • ½ cup canned fruit
  • 1 cup cut up melon
  • ¼ cup dried fruit
  • ¾ cup berries
  • 1 cup grapes

Milk Group – 1 serving equals:

  • 1 cup milk or soymilk
  • 2/3 to ¾ cup yogurt (check food label on carton)

Other Carbohydrates:

  • This group includes sweets and other carbohydrates including cookies, candies, cake and chips.
  • Try to limit the amount of these foods in the diet because they are a concentrated source of calories and fat. These foods are also very high in carbohydrates.

Food groups that do not increase blood glucose:

Non-starchy Vegetable Group

  •  Foods in this category should not be limited.
  •  Each serving of vegetables contain 5 grams of carbohydrate.
  • These include vegetables like carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, green beans, and asparagus.

Meat Group

  • Try to choose low fat meats such as skinless chicken breast, turkey or fish.
  • Avoid meats that are high in saturated fat such as bacon and sausage.

Fat Group

  • Choose monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fats which are found in foods such as olives, olive oil, canola oil, fish, nuts and other vegetable oils such as corn, safflower and soy.
  • Avoid saturated fats which are found in foods such as butter and high fat animal products.

Fiber

  • A high fiber diet can help you control your blood sugar. Choose whole grains that are high in fiber as well as fruits, vegetables, beans and lentils. Your Registered Dietitian (RD) can help you increase the fiber in your diet.

Menu Examples

Day 1

Meal #1
1 egg and 2 egg whites = 0
1 slice of whole grain toast = 15 grams
1 Tbsp diet jelly = 0
1 cup 1% milk = 15 grams

Total = 30 grams or 2 carb units

Meal #2
1 small banana = 15 grams
1 light yogurt = 15 grams

Total = 30 grams or 2 carb units

Meal #3
3 oz light tuna fis = 0
1 Tbsp light mayo = 0
2 slice of whole grain bread = 30 grams
½ cup baby carrots = 0

Total = 30 grams or 2 carb units

Meal #4
1 oz unsalted nuts = 0
1 small orange = 15 grams

Total = 15 grams or 1 carb unit

Meal #5
3oz grilled chicken breast = 0
2/3 cup brown rice = 30 grams
1 tsp butter = 0
1 cup broccoli = 0
1 cup salad = 0
1 Tbsp salad dressingv0

Total = 30 grams or 2 carb units

Total: ~1450 calories, 9 carbs, 97g protein


Day 2

Meal #1
1 whole grain English muffin = 30 grams
1 Tbsp peanut butter = 0
1 mozz string cheese = 0
1 cup herbal tea = 0

Total = 30 grams or 2 carb units

Meal #2
17 small grapes = 15 grams
¾ cup cottage cheese = 0

Total = 15 grams or 1 carb unit

Meal #3
2oz turkey breast = 0
1 Tbsp light mayo = 0
Lettuce leaf/tomato = 0
1 slice of whole grain bread = 15 grams
1 cup cucumbers = 0
1 Tbsp ranch dressing = 0
1 small apple = 15 grams

Total = 30 grams or 2 carb units

Meal #4
2 small cookies = 15 grams
1 cup 1% milk = 15 grams

Total = 30 grams or 2 carb units

Meal #5
3 oz sirloin steak = 0
1 medium baked potato = 30 grams
1 Tbsp sour cream = 0
1 cup asparagus = 0

Total = 30 grams or 2 carb units

Total: ~1400 calories, 9 carbs, 90g protein

Day 1 – 42% carb, 28% pro, 30% fat

Day 2 – 42% carb, 26% pro, 32% fat

How to Read a food label for “Total Carbohydrates”

 

1. Look at the serving size on the label and compare it to the amount you are eating.  If the serving size listed is a ½ cup and you eat 1 cup, then you have to multiply the information on the label by two.

2. Locate the total carbohydrates grams on the label and divide the grams by 15 to determine how many carbohydrate units are in the food.   

Carbohydrate Conversion Guide

     Total Carbohydrate   =   Carbohydrate Units

0-5 grams

0 carb units

6-10 grams

½ carb unit

11-20 grams

1 carb unit

21-25 grams

1 ½ units

26-35 grams

2 carb units

36-40 grams

2 ½ carb units

41-50 grams

3 carb units

51-55 grams

3 ½ carb units

56-65 grams

4 carb units





References:
  • Ohio State Medical Center.  “Carbohydrate Counting”.  Available at: http://medicalcenter.osu.edu/PatientEd/Materials/PDFDocs/nut-diet/nut-other/carbohydrate-counting.pdf.  Accessed December 2009. 
  • Fairview Health Services.  “Guide to Carbohydrate Counting”.  Minneapolis, MN: Fairview Publications, 2003.
  • University of Wisconsin Department of Medicine.  “Meal Planning with the Plate Method”.  Available at: http://www2.medicine.wisc.edu/home/naa/diabetesassist.  Accessed December 2009.
 
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